Posts tagged wintersun
Six highlights of Martinque
 

Martinique, locally named Madinina - The Isle of Flowers, is enormously popular with the French, not surprising considering it's history and the number of direct flights from Paris. However, with croissants and palm trees, all perched near a live volcano, Martinique is the definition of a refined French-Caribbean island and is an excellent base from which to start a sailing trip around St Vincent and the Grenadines as I did last month with Dream Yacht Charter  It's worth tagging on an extra couple of days before or after your trip to explore the island. Here are a few of my highlights.

Beaches

The island is 80 km by 39 km and no point is more than 12 km from the sea. The number one reason that most people visit the Caribbean is for it's beaches and Martinique has some pretty fine ones. Sainte-Anne, the area at the southern tip of the island has many headlands and coves with some beautiful white sand beaches. Being one of the major tourist spots of the island, Sainte Anne is also known for promoting sustainable development, so brownie points there #20yearstravelmatters. Le Diamant, in the south has a lovely 4 km beach and the tourist hub of Les Trois-Islets also has a handful of  great beaches. My personal favourite however was the beach at Anse d'Arlet Bourg, a traditional fishing village whose 18th century Roman Catholic church doors open almost immediately on to the beach. It's a lovely setting and as I was there on a Sunday and am catholic, particularly special to celebrate mass followed immediately by a dip in the sea.

Markets

Markets are part and parcel of life in Martinique. Forget your five a day, you can choose from dozens of different kinds of fruit and veg, some familiar and others less so. After days at sea it was fun to observe and rub shoulders with the local population as well as immersing myself in the exotic scents, tastes and colours. I particularly loved the passion fruits the size of grapefruits and a fruit, bizarrely not nameless but called anon and part of the custard apple family with the flavour of banana, vanilla, pineapple and mango all in one. Meanwhile, on every menu fish is king, the village of St Luce walking distance from my hotel along the shoreline was an excellent place for a very affordable grilled lobster eaten al fresco in a beach shack.

Hotel

Martinique is not short of accommodation ranging from luxury hotels to apartments, Caribbean inns, resorts, villas and country guesthouses.  I stayed at Residence Pierre & Vacances, a brand I know from mostly ski resorts in France.The Pierre & Vacances Holiday Village Sainte-Luce takes its name from the attractive fishing village nearby. Bordered by white sandy beaches, it extends down to the sea with a vast tropical garden and even bigger pool.  The latter particularly got the big thumbs up from me, especially at night, lit up with multi colours changing from blue, to red to green (initially another case of had I been consuming too much rum!). The guests were mostly French (so a chic and stylish bunch around the pool, restaurants and bars) and lets be honest here, the French are not going to settle for poor quality food lacking in flavour and so the latter was impressive for what is essentially a 3 star property. Set along the central pathway, the air-conditioned apartments are grouped into red-roofed buildings, typical of the tropics and all in all it was perfect base to relax initially after my flight and from which to explore the island.

Habitation Clement

"All roads lead to ... rum" and as I drank vast quantities of it on my cruise around the Grenadines, I opted for a tour of a rum distillery to discover more about the pirates tipple of choice.  Wherever you are on Martinique, a rum distillery is never far away.The rum-making season is February to June, when you'll be able to see the distilleries operating. Today nine distilleries in Martinique welcome visitors for a sampling of their product. I chose The Clement Estate, a huge 160 hectare estate, located in the town of Le Francois. There's a century-old rum house, a contemporary art museum, gardens to wander around, an 18th century creole plantation house complete with antique furniture and of course plenty of  rum to sample.

La Savane des Esclaves

La Savane des Esclaves opened in 2004 is a traditional creole village recreated by Gilbert Larose, a Martinican passionate about his island and its history. He created the site as a duty to never forget the history of slavery and the knowledge and traditions of the inhabitants of the countryside after its abolition. There are a total of 13 recreated huts and attractions from a field slaves' huts on a plantation to a museum and exhibitions. It's very well done with excellent written descriptions. You come away with a better understanding of the horrors of the slave trade and I'd recommend combining a visit here with a stop at Anse Cafard Slave memorial, a cluster of stone statues overlooking the sea commemorating the fate of dozens of slaves who lost their lives in a shipwreck of the coast.

Carnival

Like many Caribbean islands, Carnival is a popular tradition in Martinique. Organised festivities start on the Sunday following Epiphany and reach their peak during the days around Fat Tuesday (Pancake Day) and climax the Wednesday night. This year the five days of popular revelry will take place from March 2nd - 6th. I was lucky enough to be in Fort de France (the capital) on Sunday 20th January to catch one of the pre Carnival parades and what a spectacle of colour, music, drumming, noise, dancing, jubilant crowds and some pretty wacky home-made costumes. If this was just a warm up, the actual main festivities are bound to be something special with a different parade on each day: on Monday a burlesque wedding, on Fat Tuesday red devils and on Ash Wednesday she-devils, rambunctious mourners in black and white outfits. Getting a tiny taste of Carnival was for me the undoubted highlight of my visit to Martinique.

I also loved the quirky historical sites, who knew it was the birthplace of Napoleon's empress Josephine and that it's part of the EU, so no roaming charges on your phone - all in all Martinique was a perfect combination of Caribbean beauty and European flair.

To find out more about Martinique

Written by Petra Shepherd.

 
Dizzy heights in Dubai

Courtesy of If Only, I, along with other travel professionals, spent a few nights checking out the sights of Dubai, Ajman and Ras al Khaimah. The Burj Khalifa was the first visitor attraction we headed to. Bringing a new meaning to the term “sky scraper”, the world’s tallest building, standing at a proud 828 metres high with the world’s tallest observation deck at 452 metres, it is not to be missed. Entrance is best pre booked and offers sensational views over down town Dubai, the Dubai Mall, the artificial lake and the Arabian Gulf as a whole. The high speed lift was an experience in its own right.

As if one dizzy height was not enough for one day, my next achievement was the Leap of Faith at Atlantis the Palm’s aquapark. Throwing myself down the Leap of Faith, whilst worrying about doing myself a serious injury and hoping my swimsuit was still intact, the experience of racing down the slide at what seemed like 70 miles an hour, will be a memory I will never forget.

The aquapark is another “not to be missed“ attraction. If you love speed and thrills, there are plenty of waterslides and tunnels from the Aquaconda ride, the Zoomerango and NOT for the faint hearted, there is Poseidon’s Revenge, where a trapdoor opens beneath your feet to send you plummeting over 20 metres downward before rocketing you into a double loop. The lazy river and the rapids are a God send after such action.

Our first couple of nights were spent at the new kid on the block from the Jumeriah portfolio – Al Naseem. The contemporary interior design is inspired by sand dunes, blue skies, sea breeze and Dubai's heritage of pearl diving and Bedouin traditions. From the balconies and extended terraces, there are spectacular views of the sea, the resort's landscaped gardens and swimming pools and the Burj Al Arab Jumeirah. Pretty good view from my room, don’t you agree?

From Dubai, we headed north to Ras al Khaimah, staying at the Al Wadi, managed now by Ritz Carlton. The Al Wadi Nature Reserve spans across 500 hectares, so there is privacy and peace abound. Camel and horse riding, archery, nature walks and falconry educational talks are just some of the activities you can participate in during your stay. Understanding the history and heritage of falconry in the Emirates was very interesting. Bedouin tribes used the birds to hunt in the desert, to supplement their diet with meat. We didn’t need to use hawks for our dinner that evening as we sampled the menu at the Safran Restaurant where they are serving Indian food. An evening would not be complete without a night cap in the comfy Moon Bar under the canopy of stars.

Last stop was the gorgeous Oberoi Al Zorah in Ajman. Considering it can take over 30 minutes from Dubai airport to get to the Palm area of Dubai, this new resort in Ajman is going to be a strong contender for the winter sun market. It takes the same amount of time to reach Ajman as it does downtown Dubai. The Oberoi brand is synonymous with luxury and this resort does not disappoint.

It is unique amongst the other hotels in Ajman; elegant and modern, offering fantastic sea views. Accommodation is made up of suites and for families or friends travelling together, the two and three bedroom villas with private pools are incredible. The mangrove forest and 18 hole golf course as well as the spa are all welcome facilities from the hotel. The resort has to have the best swimming pool I have ever swam in. It is 85 metres long. Sheer heaven!

We flew Emirates airlines from Gatwick to Dubai. Taking just 6 hours 30 minutes to fly from London, the airline has to be my favourite of all airlines. Coming back on the A380, we took a peek around first class – can you believe there is a shower on deck? We enjoyed mingling in the cocktail lounge with other passengers until I was reminded that we had to head downstairs to economy again.

For more information on holidays to Dubai, Ajman, Ras al Khaimah and any other of the Emirates, contact Karen at Travel Matters Email info@travelmatters.co.uk and thank you to If Only for the privilege.

Mauritius with Maryna

I must confess, that while many of you had little to no sunshine to enjoy in the UK, I had the privilege to catch some rays in Mauritius, courtesy of Beachcomber hotel group. Before I went to Mauritius I had a stereotype in my head, just like anyone else. What do we instantly think of this little Indian Ocean country? It’s a place where you can find some of the best beaches, world class hotels, scrumptious seafood dishes and a melting pot of culture. Tick, tick, tick, tick plus so much more, as I have discovered. It came as a bit of a surprise that being only the size of Surrey this island country kept me occupied for good six days.

In my opinion the southern and the northern parts of the island differ enough for them both to deserve a visit. The north west boasts of the best beaches on the island. If powdery white sand similar to that in the Maldives is your idea of a perfect beach than that is where you need to be headed. From there you can also take a day trip to Port Louis, the capital and the biggest city in Mauritius full of cultural and historical treasures that should not be missed.

On the other hand the southern part of the island is ideal for nature enthusiasts as well as for beach lovers. The majestic mountains and lush vegetation set the scene for a holiday that can’t be forgotten. This part of the island has also kept a feeling of “old Mauritius”, whether it is the manner of the people, their traditions or the unspoilt scenery.

A visit to La Vanille Nature Park will make for an enjoyable day out for the whole family. It is home to a vast array of wildlife including giant tortoises, who are extremely friendly and enjoy a good tickle under their chins.

A drive to Black River Gorges national park is as spectacular as the park itself, famous for its waterfalls, vistas, bird-watching and hiking.

While there take a short detour to the “seven-colored earth” of Chamarel, a major tourist attraction of Mauritius, created by volcanic rocks that cooled at different temperatures.

If rum is your tipple of choice or you are just fascinated by how things are produced then a visit to Rhumerie De Chamarel could be easily combined with the above activities.I was extremely fortunate to experience all eight Beachcomber properties, that are scattered around the island. Being the oldest hotel group in Mauritius they had a privilege to pick the best and most exclusive locations throughout the island before their competitors saw the potential of the destination.

It’s not an exaggeration when I say that their hotels can offers something for everyone. They range from four to an impressive six star and are perfect for families, golfers and romantic breaks alike.

British Airways offer an excellent overnight direct service to Mauritius from London Gatwick.

Maryna travelled courtesy of Beachcomber Hotels and their partner British Airways in December 2016