Posts tagged beaches
Kerala with Karen

Cochin airport, our airport of arrival in Kerala, is the first airport in the world to be run on solar energy. It has more than 46,000 solar panels which take the bright sunlight and converts it into energy. The airport is extremely clean, spacious and with this accolade to shout about – we were already impressed by the “God’s Own Country” strap line and care that the people of Kerala have towards this part of India. We had read up about Kerala’s attitude to responsible tourism and our first encounter on arrival got some brownie points.

Kerala is one of the southern states in India and boasts over 600kms of coastline, the Arabian Sea, as well as a beautiful interior of countryside, banana and rubber plantations, mountains, waterfalls and the backwaters – meandering canals that take you past fields, coconut groves, small village hamlets and villages.

First stop for us was Cochin (Kochi)– we got around on tuk tuks as well as on foot and used the public ferry to cross from Willingdon Island to Fort Cochin. Walking around Jew Town, we past independent shops selling handicrafts, silks, spices, artefacts and perfumes. The walk was colourful, relaxed and interesting – there was no hassle from shop keepers or bartering.

Look out for the Chinese fishing nets on the beachfront, they are unique to Cochin. These nets are found only in Cochin, outside China! We checked out St. Francis Church as it is the oldest church built by Europeans in India. Vasco da Gama, the Portuguese trader who reached India from Europe by sea, fell ill and died in Cochin. His burial spot is within the church.

The second part of our Kerala adventure was 24 hours on the backwaters. We headed to Allepey and embarked on a houseboat to cruise this water network. There is over 900kms of waterways including five large lakes linked by canals, fed by no less than 38 rivers. They extend half the length of Kerala state. The kettuvallams (houseboats) were traditionally used as grain barges, to transport the rice harvested in the fertile fields alongside the backwaters.

Marari Beach Resort – is one of the CGH properties. It is a small slice of heaven on earth and we were blessed to be based here for several days. CGHEarth Hotels have a model which should be an example to any business. Their company ethos and response to nature and people are a force for good and are very much reflected in everything they offer - from their care to the environment in architecture style and locations of their properties to the staff, services and activities you can experience. A winning formula.

The last part of our family adventure in Kerala was a stay at Dewalokam. Run by the most hospitable of hosts, Jose and Sinta. Dewalokam is a working farm and homestay and offers peaceful surroundings by the riverside. You are treated to home grown produce and freshly cooked traditional Keralan food. A guided walk around the farm will teach you all about the various spices that grown here like pepper, nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, ginger and turmeric.

Dewalokam is a working farm, run on organic and eco principles. The water is heated with solar power, vegetables grown with home-made compost, chickens and goats fed on vegetable waste and methane from the cows manure is recovered to provide gas for cooking.

We spent a relaxing afternoon down by the river, jumping off the rope swing into the water and paddling in the inflatable boat whilst glimpsing the azure flash of kingfishers' wings as well as spotting egrets, herons, white ibis and hornbills.

We had to leave a little earlier than planned from this retreat – there had been violent protests around Kerala after two women made history by entering the prominent Sabarimala temple. It had been closed to women before. Our hosts advised us not to travel on the road between 6am and 6pm for fear of being caught in the protests.I must add that this did not mar our experiences and impressions of Kerala one bit. Kerala is a world away from the somewhat chaotic areas of India's other states. Kerala is serenely beautiful, peaceful, mystical and a balm to the soul. Its culture, literature and development have always made India proud and with a literacy rate of 93.91 among its own, scholars believe that the education system in Kerala has already achieved the momentum required to lead the entire country towards positive development. We welcome and celebrate that fact and want to encourage you to visit Kerala for yourself.

Karen travelled with her family to Kerala in December 2018. Ask her for details or drop us a line for more information.

Six highlights of Martinque
 

Martinique, locally named Madinina - The Isle of Flowers, is enormously popular with the French, not surprising considering it's history and the number of direct flights from Paris. However, with croissants and palm trees, all perched near a live volcano, Martinique is the definition of a refined French-Caribbean island and is an excellent base from which to start a sailing trip around St Vincent and the Grenadines as I did last month with Dream Yacht Charter  It's worth tagging on an extra couple of days before or after your trip to explore the island. Here are a few of my highlights.

Beaches

The island is 80 km by 39 km and no point is more than 12 km from the sea. The number one reason that most people visit the Caribbean is for it's beaches and Martinique has some pretty fine ones. Sainte-Anne, the area at the southern tip of the island has many headlands and coves with some beautiful white sand beaches. Being one of the major tourist spots of the island, Sainte Anne is also known for promoting sustainable development, so brownie points there #20yearstravelmatters. Le Diamant, in the south has a lovely 4 km beach and the tourist hub of Les Trois-Islets also has a handful of  great beaches. My personal favourite however was the beach at Anse d'Arlet Bourg, a traditional fishing village whose 18th century Roman Catholic church doors open almost immediately on to the beach. It's a lovely setting and as I was there on a Sunday and am catholic, particularly special to celebrate mass followed immediately by a dip in the sea.

Markets

Markets are part and parcel of life in Martinique. Forget your five a day, you can choose from dozens of different kinds of fruit and veg, some familiar and others less so. After days at sea it was fun to observe and rub shoulders with the local population as well as immersing myself in the exotic scents, tastes and colours. I particularly loved the passion fruits the size of grapefruits and a fruit, bizarrely not nameless but called anon and part of the custard apple family with the flavour of banana, vanilla, pineapple and mango all in one. Meanwhile, on every menu fish is king, the village of St Luce walking distance from my hotel along the shoreline was an excellent place for a very affordable grilled lobster eaten al fresco in a beach shack.

Hotel

Martinique is not short of accommodation ranging from luxury hotels to apartments, Caribbean inns, resorts, villas and country guesthouses.  I stayed at Residence Pierre & Vacances, a brand I know from mostly ski resorts in France.The Pierre & Vacances Holiday Village Sainte-Luce takes its name from the attractive fishing village nearby. Bordered by white sandy beaches, it extends down to the sea with a vast tropical garden and even bigger pool.  The latter particularly got the big thumbs up from me, especially at night, lit up with multi colours changing from blue, to red to green (initially another case of had I been consuming too much rum!). The guests were mostly French (so a chic and stylish bunch around the pool, restaurants and bars) and lets be honest here, the French are not going to settle for poor quality food lacking in flavour and so the latter was impressive for what is essentially a 3 star property. Set along the central pathway, the air-conditioned apartments are grouped into red-roofed buildings, typical of the tropics and all in all it was perfect base to relax initially after my flight and from which to explore the island.

Habitation Clement

"All roads lead to ... rum" and as I drank vast quantities of it on my cruise around the Grenadines, I opted for a tour of a rum distillery to discover more about the pirates tipple of choice.  Wherever you are on Martinique, a rum distillery is never far away.The rum-making season is February to June, when you'll be able to see the distilleries operating. Today nine distilleries in Martinique welcome visitors for a sampling of their product. I chose The Clement Estate, a huge 160 hectare estate, located in the town of Le Francois. There's a century-old rum house, a contemporary art museum, gardens to wander around, an 18th century creole plantation house complete with antique furniture and of course plenty of  rum to sample.

La Savane des Esclaves

La Savane des Esclaves opened in 2004 is a traditional creole village recreated by Gilbert Larose, a Martinican passionate about his island and its history. He created the site as a duty to never forget the history of slavery and the knowledge and traditions of the inhabitants of the countryside after its abolition. There are a total of 13 recreated huts and attractions from a field slaves' huts on a plantation to a museum and exhibitions. It's very well done with excellent written descriptions. You come away with a better understanding of the horrors of the slave trade and I'd recommend combining a visit here with a stop at Anse Cafard Slave memorial, a cluster of stone statues overlooking the sea commemorating the fate of dozens of slaves who lost their lives in a shipwreck of the coast.

Carnival

Like many Caribbean islands, Carnival is a popular tradition in Martinique. Organised festivities start on the Sunday following Epiphany and reach their peak during the days around Fat Tuesday (Pancake Day) and climax the Wednesday night. This year the five days of popular revelry will take place from March 2nd - 6th. I was lucky enough to be in Fort de France (the capital) on Sunday 20th January to catch one of the pre Carnival parades and what a spectacle of colour, music, drumming, noise, dancing, jubilant crowds and some pretty wacky home-made costumes. If this was just a warm up, the actual main festivities are bound to be something special with a different parade on each day: on Monday a burlesque wedding, on Fat Tuesday red devils and on Ash Wednesday she-devils, rambunctious mourners in black and white outfits. Getting a tiny taste of Carnival was for me the undoubted highlight of my visit to Martinique.

I also loved the quirky historical sites, who knew it was the birthplace of Napoleon's empress Josephine and that it's part of the EU, so no roaming charges on your phone - all in all Martinique was a perfect combination of Caribbean beauty and European flair.

To find out more about Martinique

Written by Petra Shepherd.

 
Santa Eularia des Riu - Ibiza

Santa Eularia des Riu is one of Ibiza's five municipalities and is the second largest region in Ibiza. Located on the Eastern shore, it also includes an impressive stretch of coastline with more than 20 beaches as well as rural farmland. It's a corner of the island far removed from the clubs of San Antonio opting for a brand of tourism that is respectful to the environment while honouring local roots and traditions. All elements close to our hearts here at Travel Matters. The area also focuses on family holidays and it was this aspect of the region that I set out to find out more about over the first Bank Holiday weekend.

Santa Eularia des Riu is the first municipality in the Balearic Islands to implement a family tourism seal guaranteeing that hotels, restaurants and attractions fulfil the needs and specific requirements for families.  Hotels with the seal have a long list of requirements to fulfil, too many to name them all but they include providing children's entertainment, child-proof wall sockets in rooms and common areas, children's menus in dining rooms and buffets, cots, baby baths, doors that do not catch little fingers. Every thought has been given to a child's safety, well being and enjoyment and if your child is protected and content, then there’s every chance you are going to be as well! This new initiative focusing on the family market is known as 'Family Moments'.

Es Figueral Beach

Es Figueral Beach

Most families will be visiting the region for the 46 km of sun-soaked pristine beaches with crystal-clear waters thanks to the sea grass growing on the coastal bed. The gently shelving water is a plus and I loved the fact that the Santa Eularia beach is the first non-smoking beach in the Balearic Islands. No danger of your toddler digging up cigarette butts when making sandcastles here. Santa Eularia also has some of the best gelato parlors I've come across outside of Italy. 

The beach of Cala Llonga (my personal favourite) has been certified with the Universal Accessibility IS 17001.  Basically this means that the beach is fully accessible for people with mobility issues, from the parking area to the sea including a service of assisted bathing with amphibious wheelchairs and crutches.  We're keen here at Travel Matters to promote multi-generational holidays and Cala Llonga would be a good resort to visit, if travelling with a grand-parent with mobility issues.

I was based for my stay in Santa Eularia itself at two contrasting hotels who have signed their commitment to the 'Family Moments'programme. The first Hotel Riomar is located just metres from the beach, with magnificent sea views and is a good starting point for the 3.1 km 'River Route' taking in highlights of the town's cultural, historical and natural attractions. On the other side of the bay, Aguas de Ibiza is a luxury design hotel with a free spa, outdoor pool and rooftop bar with views of the marina and the island of Formentera. This 5 star, all white, contemporary hotel, although fulfilling the family seal requirements would also make an excellent choice for an adult only mini break.

However, the big hitter, the grand dame so to speak of family focused hotels in the region is the Invisa Figueral Resort including Invisa Hotel Club Cala Verde and Invisa Hotel Club Cala Blanca www.invisahoteles.com. Located 10 km from Santa Eularia on Es Figueral beach, one of the finest on the island and with a good range of nautical activities - the likes of paddle surfs, canoes and pedalos. The hotel has some excellent family rooms, a water park that looked enormous fun for both adults and children and even the children's buffet had me drooling.

Santa Eularia des Riu was the cradle of the hippie movement on the island. If you have teens in tow then a trip to the hippy market every Saturday at Las Dalias in San Carlos is an absolute must. There are no shortage of stalls selling the sort of festival gear, peasant blouses and flower braids that are currently enormously popular and a fraction of the price you'll find at one of our local chichi boutiques or at this summer's festivals. I went crazy for the jewellery, stocking up my present draw for years to come. The biggest market though is the Punta Arabi Hippy Market on Wednesdays in Es Cana, but more touristy and the quality perhaps not quite as good. Toddlers on the other hand might enjoy a visit to Eco Finca Can Muson, www.ibizacanmuson.com also part of the Family Moments charter. This is a charming, simple rural farm where your little ones can feed the chickens and goats whilst you indulge in the delicious home-made cakes!

However, the undoubted highlight of my visit was the fact I was there for the May fiesta, the main celebration being the first Sunday in May. Next year on May 5th and a visit could easily be combined with the May bank holiday. There is folk dancing, a long procession of carts decked out in flowers and ribbons, people wearing traditional dress, flower shows, basically folklore fun for all the family. If there's something the Spanish do very well, then it's their fiestas. I tend to go to one a year (last year the Semana Santa celebrations in Madrid) and this was one of the most joyous and heart-warming I have ever attended.

Petra with traditionally dressed ladies at the May fiesta

Petra with traditionally dressed ladies at the May fiesta

In 1912, the painter Laurea Barrau remarked on Santa Eularia des Riu that, "Everything here is more beautiful than I could have imagined. A painter's entire life can be found here" This was my first visit to Ibiza and I too found the region not only very beautiful (the wild flowers were out in profusion) but welcoming, warm and above all particularly child friendly.

To find out more about the region visit http://visitsantaeulalia.com/en/

Petra visited Ibiza in May 2018.

Cyprus in Spring

Cyprus isn’t the place that people readily think of as a destination for Easter holidays, yet having just returned from this beautiful country I highly recommend April as the brilliant time to go. The temperatures are very pleasant and the weather is generally sunny. In fact, Cyprus boasts an impressive 326 days of sun per year. Those who can’t imagine a holiday without swimming in the sea will probably find the water still a bit cold, but then many hotels offer heated pools and staying in pleasantly warm water with gentle sunshine on your face is just pure bliss.For me, April in Cyprus is the definition of perfect weather - mild t-shirt weather that allows you to explore cultural sights and natural wonders comfortably, yet keeping your vitamin D levels in check.

On this trip, I had the privilege to experience two gorgeous hotels – The Anassa and the newly renovated Columbia Beach Resort.I spent three magical nights at the Anassa, courtesy of the Thanos hotel group. The hotel is celebrating 20 years this spring, but its style could only be described as timeless. It is also a regular nominee for World's Best Spa having recently come third according to Conde Nast.

Although Anassa means queen in Greek, it was us who were treated like royalty and all meals that I had there could only be described as feasts. When it comes to food, the chefs at the Anassa do not take shortcuts. Everything is fresh, flavourful and of the highest quality. Even their cheeses are freshly handmade from organic sheep milk - feta, haloumi, ricotta. The location of the property is idyllic, within a national park with a stretch of unspoilt beach.

The hotel is very family friendly and guests can hire bikes, catamarans, go hiking, play tennis or even go scuba diving off St George's island to spot turtles and sea sponges. Columbia Beach Resort is a member of the Small Luxury hotels of the World and has been a favourite of ours for quite some time and has seen a large number of repeat clients. It has been recently renovated and offers traditional as well as more contemporary accommodation, depending on the part of the resort that you choose. The location is really picturesque with its long pebbly beach and the backdrop of mountains. The activities on offer will please even the pickiest  - there are water sports, professional BMC bicycles for hire, as well as the longest pool I have seen anywhere. The resort also has crèche and a kids club. Family hotels do not get better than that!

Cyprus is so much more that a beach destination. The beautiful Troodos Mountains have a network of walking paths with pretty picnic spots, as well as numerous quaint traditional villages. The area is also famous for its religious sites and monasteries and shelters a number of stunning, frescoed late-Byzantine churches. I highly recommend visiting Omodos with its pretty cobbled centre and 12th-century monastery. It makes for a good lunch stop while exploring the mountains. I also loved our visit to Kykkos Monastery which is one of the most opulent monasteries in Cyprus and also has a museum. The location is very picturesque indeed! For wine lovers there are several wine routes to follow and they all are really panoramic. How do you like our stop below?

Paphos is one of the historical centres of Cyprus, with a medieval fortress and the Kato Archaeological Park, which houses some of the world's best-preserved mosaics. In fact, Paphos was awarded European Capital of Culture 2017.

To sum it all up, sunny Cyprus ticks virtually all the boxes for a year round holiday.

Maryna travelled to Cyprus in April courtesy of Thanos hotels and Columbia Beach Resort.

The Byron at Byron Resort & Spa

Bryon Bay is Australia's easternmost town, home to excellent beaches and lush rain forests.  It really needs no introduction, having been a popular holiday destination seemingly forever. It was very much on the radar when my contemporaries were taking their gap year (we called it a year off!) and now my nephews and nieces back-packing around Australia are also getting to enjoy the town's unique vibe.

However, I've decided I'm now a flash-packer as opposed to back-packer, seeking comfort, good food and unique experiences. I was in Byron Bay in December and The Byron at Byron, my chosen resort for a two night stay ticked all these boxes. A friend, Elizabeth was also coming to join me, a 4 hour drive from her Queensland home (probably not a long journey by Australian standards) but nevertheless I wanted a treat place for us to stay and for her trip to be worthwhile. The award-winning The Byron at Byron Resort and Spa is Byron Bay's leading resort, offering exceptional accommodation, a day spa and restaurant. The resort sits within a 45 acre subtropical rain forest that teams with wildlife and endangered ecosystems and is just minutes from Byron Bay town centre.

Whenever I stay anywhere before I even check out the room I like to check out the swimming pool. The infinity pool at The Byron at Byron is not hard to miss and is perhaps one of the most iconic features of the resort. 25 metres (so excellent for doing lengths and plenty of room for everyone), deep blue tiles and more than enough sunbeds to go round. Life at The Byron at Bryon focuses around the pool, the restaurant, bar and reception area all over look it and from the pool to the beach there are acres of rain forest with the accommodation hidden amongst the trees.

My room was fully air-conditioned, a must in the Australian summer heat. Byron has an enviable climate of warm winters and hot summers. More than enough space with an L shaped lounge, galley kitchen and dining table for four. A creature of habit, I'd brought along my PG Tips for my morning cuppa but for coffee lovers there was a Nespresso coffee machine, also two balconies to relax on and listen to the rainforest coming to life and a shower and separate bath to soak in. No complaints here, except surrounded by trees there are of course no sea views and it can get a little dark. However, the sea is not far away.

A few minutes walk brings you to Tallow Beach, one of those jaw dropping Australian beaches that go on for ever and ever. The surfs not bad either. Australian's get up very early, so do as the Aussies do and join the power walkers on the beach at 7 am before heading back to the resort for breakfast and the rest of the day by the pool.

For the more active, the resort offers plenty of activities. Tennis, bike hire, a gym, 2 km of rainforest boardwalks and a complimentary rain forest walk. Guide Graham Read takes you on an informative journey through the tropical rain forest, giving insight into the history of this sensitive site and its transformation from a derelict area to what it is today. If you want to visit Byron Bay itself, there's a complimentary shuttle bus offering three services daily to and from the centre of town.

Elizabeth is a yoga fanatic and was thrilled that the resort offers a complimentary daily yoga class for all ages and stages but was not so thrilled by the 8 am prompt start. However, still a great way to welcome in the new day. The yoga class takes place on the spa deck and mats are provided.

I, on the other hand, am a foodie fanatic and dinner at the resort's restaurant by chef Matthew Kemp didn't disappoint. Matthew Kemp is one of Australia's most recognised and respected chefs. Michelin trained and originally from the UK, he opened his own restaurant,  Restaurant Balzac in Sydney's Eastern suburb in 2000 to much critical acclaim. Kemp fuses European cuisine and Asian flavours in his own individual way. The restaurant, bar, reception and relaxation deck have also all recently been transformed by leading interior architect Rachel Luchetti (also responsible for the The Four Seasons Hotel and Centennial Hotels in Sydney)  This major upgrade has only just been completed, so for all those who may already know the resort, I'd recommend returning to see the exciting changes, particularly the new statement copper island bar.  During my stay, there were a few members of the barmy army staying soaking up their sorrows from England's disastrous test series and various children happily enjoying the pool and smaller ones the wading pool.

All in all, the resort has a great vibe. If you're heading to Brisbane and the Gold Coast and looking for somewhere quieter to unwind, then I can highly recommend The Byron and Byron. It's also a perfect base to explore the Byron Bay region with it's strong cultural reputation and relaxed lifestyle, not forgetting the surfing, beaches and whale watching, between June and October humpback whales can be spotted from headland viewpoints such as the Captain Cook Lookout. This laid back corner of Australia has been drawing visitors for years and it's not difficult to see why.

To find out more about The Byron at Byron visit https://www.thebyronatbyron.com.au/

To find out more about Byron Bay visit http://www.australia.com/en/places/sydney-and-surrounds/guide-to-byron-bay.html

Petra Shepherd travelled to Byron Bay in December 2017

A Caribbean island hopping experience

Not many people have the Caribbean on their summer radar and that really is a shame. The rates are unbelievably attractive and the weather is good. Humidity is higher, it is true, but on the whole it is sunny and hot with short spells of occasional rain, sometimes only several minutes long – and then it's business as usual!

I hear opinions that the Caribbean is just all about beaches, hotels and a glitzy lifestyle and there is not much else. Sure, the islands  won’t make cultural destinations of the year any time soon, but there is still enough activities to keep one occupied in between the tan topping sessions.

Barbados has such a rich Dutch and British heritage and this gets reflected in many ways. A tour of Bridgetown combined with Mount Gay distillery visit - apparently the oldest rum distillery in the world - makes for an interesting day out. You should consider a visit to the colourful Speightstown with its impressive fresco or manicured Holetown, which looks really western with its beautiful residences and designer boutiques. Barbados is also home to a great number of gorgeous Anglican churches that fit harmoniously with the lush tropical settings. Or how about a visit to one of the historical plantation great houses, like Sunbury Plantation House or St. Nicholas Abbey? It is a great way to find out how sugar cane plantations operated centuries ago and taste yet more rum!

Nature lovers would be happy with snorkelling, swimming with turtles, visiting Harrisons Cave or one of the botanical gardens. I strongly recommend heading to the East coast for a day. Bathsheba is home to the famous reef break known as the Soup Bowl. The coastline is beautiful and rugged and its sea front restaurants and weird rock formations that point out of the sand are worth the visit alone.

When it comes to accommodation in Barbados, you are spoilt for choice – Sandy Lane, Cobbler’s Cove, Colony Club, Fairmont Royal Pavilion – the list goes on. I, personally, thoroughly enjoyed my stay at The Little Good Harbour – an intimate family-run property located in a quiet fishing village on the famed west coast. The atmosphere is very laid back and truly Caribbean, which in my opinion some higher end properties might sometimes lack. Accommodation ranges from one-bedroom suites to three bedroom units and is equally perfect for couples, groups of friends or families. I just loved my split-level Garden suite! Their restaurant, The Fish Pot is one of the best eateries on the island and is an attraction in itself. Book early! Needless to say, the food is outstanding. I particularly enjoyed my breakfast of flying fish on toast.

Cobblers Cove is another place where I would go back to in a heart beat. It is a member of the prestigious Relais and Chateaux hotel group and is everything that one would expect – small, charming, with a service that is equal to none. It is a truly special place!The suites are not only absolutely stunning but are also ideal for bird watching. I counted no less than a dozen of species from my balcony and even had a nest right next to my window. It is not surprising considering, its gardens are not dissimilar to Eden itself. Their restaurant is very famous as well and is well worth a visit if you are staying elsewhere.Once you arrive in St. Lucia you end up in a totally different world. Even though all the islands are known collectively as the Caribbean they all are very unique and have their own identity. St Lucia differs from Barbados like day and night. It is still relatively undeveloped and unspoilt and is sometimes referred to like Barbados 20 years ago. It's landscape is very different as well - it's is very mountainous and tropically green where Barbados is flat and bare. The jewel on the crown is of course the majestic Pitons.

If Barbados is more known for its night life, high profile visitors and upmarket restaurants, St Lucia is more about uniting with the nature and getting away from it all. Many hotels are eco friendly and are blended seamlessly into the surroundings. Even the attractions are mostly nature oriented like snorkelling, diving, zip wiring or visiting the sulphur springs of Soufriere.

I had a chance to experience two properties while in St. Lucia.

East Winds is a beautiful "all-inclusive" resort, but don't let the a-word put you off. It is very small, characterful and the food is to die for - very authentic, healthy and fresh. We fell in love with our deluxe cottage with a private terrace sheltered under the canopy of mango trees.At East Winds I understood the true meaning of a Caribbean holiday, where all you do is sip on a cocktail, look at the waves and read in a hammock. I came back recharged and looking several years younger. But it's not all about low-key rest. There are plenty of daily activities on offer for busy types.

Another property that I was very lucky to experience was Marigot Bay Resort by Capella. It occupies one of the most enviable locations on the island overlooking the famous bay as well the picture perfect marina. If you are after pure luxury, stunning views, poolside sushi and exceptional service with your own personal concierge then this is the place to be.

The rooms are elegant and contemporary and finished to the highest standard.If you are going for a longer holiday, why not combine a week on the beach with a few days at the Capella for a truly special holiday?

In conclusion I want to officially announce my island hopping experience a success and am already looking forward to another combination next year.

Dizzy heights in Dubai

Courtesy of If Only, I, along with other travel professionals, spent a few nights checking out the sights of Dubai, Ajman and Ras al Khaimah. The Burj Khalifa was the first visitor attraction we headed to. Bringing a new meaning to the term “sky scraper”, the world’s tallest building, standing at a proud 828 metres high with the world’s tallest observation deck at 452 metres, it is not to be missed. Entrance is best pre booked and offers sensational views over down town Dubai, the Dubai Mall, the artificial lake and the Arabian Gulf as a whole. The high speed lift was an experience in its own right.

As if one dizzy height was not enough for one day, my next achievement was the Leap of Faith at Atlantis the Palm’s aquapark. Throwing myself down the Leap of Faith, whilst worrying about doing myself a serious injury and hoping my swimsuit was still intact, the experience of racing down the slide at what seemed like 70 miles an hour, will be a memory I will never forget.

The aquapark is another “not to be missed“ attraction. If you love speed and thrills, there are plenty of waterslides and tunnels from the Aquaconda ride, the Zoomerango and NOT for the faint hearted, there is Poseidon’s Revenge, where a trapdoor opens beneath your feet to send you plummeting over 20 metres downward before rocketing you into a double loop. The lazy river and the rapids are a God send after such action.

Our first couple of nights were spent at the new kid on the block from the Jumeriah portfolio – Al Naseem. The contemporary interior design is inspired by sand dunes, blue skies, sea breeze and Dubai's heritage of pearl diving and Bedouin traditions. From the balconies and extended terraces, there are spectacular views of the sea, the resort's landscaped gardens and swimming pools and the Burj Al Arab Jumeirah. Pretty good view from my room, don’t you agree?

From Dubai, we headed north to Ras al Khaimah, staying at the Al Wadi, managed now by Ritz Carlton. The Al Wadi Nature Reserve spans across 500 hectares, so there is privacy and peace abound. Camel and horse riding, archery, nature walks and falconry educational talks are just some of the activities you can participate in during your stay. Understanding the history and heritage of falconry in the Emirates was very interesting. Bedouin tribes used the birds to hunt in the desert, to supplement their diet with meat. We didn’t need to use hawks for our dinner that evening as we sampled the menu at the Safran Restaurant where they are serving Indian food. An evening would not be complete without a night cap in the comfy Moon Bar under the canopy of stars.

Last stop was the gorgeous Oberoi Al Zorah in Ajman. Considering it can take over 30 minutes from Dubai airport to get to the Palm area of Dubai, this new resort in Ajman is going to be a strong contender for the winter sun market. It takes the same amount of time to reach Ajman as it does downtown Dubai. The Oberoi brand is synonymous with luxury and this resort does not disappoint.

It is unique amongst the other hotels in Ajman; elegant and modern, offering fantastic sea views. Accommodation is made up of suites and for families or friends travelling together, the two and three bedroom villas with private pools are incredible. The mangrove forest and 18 hole golf course as well as the spa are all welcome facilities from the hotel. The resort has to have the best swimming pool I have ever swam in. It is 85 metres long. Sheer heaven!

We flew Emirates airlines from Gatwick to Dubai. Taking just 6 hours 30 minutes to fly from London, the airline has to be my favourite of all airlines. Coming back on the A380, we took a peek around first class – can you believe there is a shower on deck? We enjoyed mingling in the cocktail lounge with other passengers until I was reminded that we had to head downstairs to economy again.

For more information on holidays to Dubai, Ajman, Ras al Khaimah and any other of the Emirates, contact Karen at Travel Matters Email info@travelmatters.co.uk and thank you to If Only for the privilege.

Mauritius with Maryna

I must confess, that while many of you had little to no sunshine to enjoy in the UK, I had the privilege to catch some rays in Mauritius, courtesy of Beachcomber hotel group. Before I went to Mauritius I had a stereotype in my head, just like anyone else. What do we instantly think of this little Indian Ocean country? It’s a place where you can find some of the best beaches, world class hotels, scrumptious seafood dishes and a melting pot of culture. Tick, tick, tick, tick plus so much more, as I have discovered. It came as a bit of a surprise that being only the size of Surrey this island country kept me occupied for good six days.

In my opinion the southern and the northern parts of the island differ enough for them both to deserve a visit. The north west boasts of the best beaches on the island. If powdery white sand similar to that in the Maldives is your idea of a perfect beach than that is where you need to be headed. From there you can also take a day trip to Port Louis, the capital and the biggest city in Mauritius full of cultural and historical treasures that should not be missed.

On the other hand the southern part of the island is ideal for nature enthusiasts as well as for beach lovers. The majestic mountains and lush vegetation set the scene for a holiday that can’t be forgotten. This part of the island has also kept a feeling of “old Mauritius”, whether it is the manner of the people, their traditions or the unspoilt scenery.

A visit to La Vanille Nature Park will make for an enjoyable day out for the whole family. It is home to a vast array of wildlife including giant tortoises, who are extremely friendly and enjoy a good tickle under their chins.

A drive to Black River Gorges national park is as spectacular as the park itself, famous for its waterfalls, vistas, bird-watching and hiking.

While there take a short detour to the “seven-colored earth” of Chamarel, a major tourist attraction of Mauritius, created by volcanic rocks that cooled at different temperatures.

If rum is your tipple of choice or you are just fascinated by how things are produced then a visit to Rhumerie De Chamarel could be easily combined with the above activities.I was extremely fortunate to experience all eight Beachcomber properties, that are scattered around the island. Being the oldest hotel group in Mauritius they had a privilege to pick the best and most exclusive locations throughout the island before their competitors saw the potential of the destination.

It’s not an exaggeration when I say that their hotels can offers something for everyone. They range from four to an impressive six star and are perfect for families, golfers and romantic breaks alike.

British Airways offer an excellent overnight direct service to Mauritius from London Gatwick.

Maryna travelled courtesy of Beachcomber Hotels and their partner British Airways in December 2016

La Dolce Vita - a short break in Puglia

Also known by it's Roman name Apulia, the 'heel' of Italy is currently one of those hot destinations that's on a roll. No longer such a well kept secret, I recently visited to see what all the fuss is about and check out two equally stunning but very contrasting properties. A Masseria is a renovated Puglian farmhouse and a visit to Puglia wouldn't be complete without a stay in one of these. For a one of a kind spoiling mini break, perhaps to celebrate a special birthday or anniversary, I can highly recommend Masseria Torre Coccaro. It's one of the most luxurious Masseria's around and opened as a resort hotel in 2002. The one hour drive from Bari airport (just under a 2 1/2 hour flight from the UK) is nothing to write home about, a rather dull flat landscape of endless olive trees. However, any sense of disappointment is quickly dispelled on arrival at the Masseria, a brilliant white building with lush pink bougainvillea rising high above the olive groves.  Instant smiles all round which only got bigger once we saw our room. To say that the ceilings were high and the bathroom big would be an understatement, the room complete with antique furnishings (and a welcome bottle of Limoncello) oozed character and charm.  Luxury hotel rooms, although faultless with their Egyptian cotton sheets and flat screen TVs do tend to be all rather similar, if you're looking for something a little different but still with all the mod cons, then this is the place for you. We didn't want to leave the pretty balcony overlooking the surrounding countryside and out to sea but having forsaken Easyjet's sandwich options (not too much of a hardship!) and with stomachs rumbling it was time to try out the Masseria's restaurant. Now, I'll be honest, I'll eat anything, my nephews and nieces have taken to calling me "the human dustbin" but the friend I was traveling with is much more discerning. Nicky along with her husband, has travelled the world, staying at a fair number of leading and small luxury hotels.  Her judgement  is impeccable and the restaurant at Masseria Torre Coccaro got the big thumbs up. The menu is original with many locally sourced products and being so close to the sea, fish is a must, even the names sound like some dramatic opera "Polpo e Patate con Salsa di Capperi e Sedano Croccante" octopus with potatoes and capers cream with crispy celery. We opted for seared sword fish steak on olive pate and summer salad, exquisite and worth the trip alone.

The Great British Bake Off, it would appear isn't just a phenomenon in the UK. Nicky and I were blown away by the amount of cakes on offer at breakfast, deep breath " lemon cake, strawberry jam pie, apple pie, pound cake, apricot jam pie, pasticciotto, muffins, bakewell tart, chocolate pie, ciambella, pistachio pie and not forgetting that old faithful madeira cake. Mary and Paul would be in "bake of heaven" and not a soggy bottom or collapsed gateau in sight! Cakes at breakfast might not be everybody's thing or piling your plate high with mozarella, stracciatella, burrata and ricotta but as a cheese freak I was more than happy to do the latter, accompanied by a generous portion of prosciutto.

Masseria Torre Coccaro is the antithesis of a big resort hotel with a multitude of swimming pools, they've just the one but it's gentle sloping nature, reminiscent of a beach makes it perfect for children whilst it soon gets deep enough for doing lengths. There were a few beautifully dressed and beautifully behaved Italian children staying on our visit and the hotel is that odd combination that somehow works, that you could visit for a romantic break (the hotel has been voted as one of the 100 most romantic hotels in the world by The Times), a honeymoon, babymoon with a new born or with children.  There's a children's club for 3 - 12 year olds.

Masseria Torre Coccaro is so relaxing, so aesthetically beautiful, that Nicky and I didn't really want or need to leave. We were more than happy to enjoy our room in the watch tower, sitting chatting on the balcony looking out over the courtyard and 18th century chapel before indulging ourselves in the cave like Aveda spa or falling into a carb coma (see breakfast cakes above) on the comfortable sunbeds by the pool.

Just a ten minute taxi ride away from Masseria Torre Coccaro, our second hotel Canne Bianche Hotel and Spa boasts an idyllic sea front location. It's one of the few hotels in Puglia with direct access to a sandy beach. However, this is not the hotel's only USP. It's the interiors that we both loved here. The tasteful lobby has a number of china pomos, something that you can also buy and take home with you. A pomo, which represents a "flower bud"" is a wonderful symbol of tradition, art and poetry and is also a lucky charm against magic spells.

In London, along with Karen I daily head to Tooting Bec Lido to swim an hours worth of lengths. However, with the heat wave this summer the lido has begun to resemble human soup, so you imagine my joy at having the large crystal clear salt water swimming pool at Canne Biance more or less to myself.  The saltwater giving you extra buoyancy in which to swim and I loved the fact that inflatables were banned from the pool. On our mini break we were content to swim, read, unwind and enjoy the facilities that both hotels had in spades. However, they were both well placed for exploring this fascinating corner or Italy. You will need a car but the 'White City' of Ostuni is just 20 minutes drive away whilst Alberobello, famous for its Truilli houses can be reached in 30 minutes or for a longer full day excursion, there's Leece, known as the Florence of the south, without the crowds. Again, Southern Italy is having a bit of a moment with neighbouring Matera used as the back drop for the new Ben-Hur and Wonder Women movies.

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Canne Bianche also has a spa and like Masseria Torre Coccaro a cooking school, where you can try your hand at Apulia regional cooking learning how to make the traditional ear like Orecchiette pasta. Other lessons on offer include golf, tennis, sailing, horse riding, snorkling, even piano. However, Nicky and I went with the "let's just chill" option and with the busy lives we all now lead, this is often the best. Canne Bianche has been billed as the ultimate Puglian pamper getaway for those wishing to simply unwind. Again, we didn't leave the hotel but returned to London mellower and heavier - I blame all those cakes!

Travel Matters can arrange a stay at Masseria Torre Coccaro http://www.masseriatorrecoccaro.com/en/home/ and Canne Bianche http://www.cannebianche.com/?lang=en

Easyjet http://www.easyjet.com/en/ has flights all year round directly to Bari from London, Gatwick

Sicily

I had always wanted to visit Sicily, I just hadn’t had the opportunity to until now. I had heard how beautiful it is and having travelled extensively around  Italy, Corsica and Sardinia, I was intrigued to know just how special it could be. (After all, it is technically still Italy) Thanks to one of our preferred tour operators, Prestige Holidays, I was invited to experience the island for myself on what we term in the trade as a “familiarisation trip”.

Flying into Catania is exciting and dramatic, if skies are clear you get a terrific view of Mount Etna, Europe’s tallest and most active volcano. Standing at 3350 metres, it had a smattering of snow on it and the mouth of the crater was surrounded by a cloud of steam.

First impressions on arriving and driving to our first hotel, I noticed that most of the south eastern part of Sicily has plenty of baroque architecture still standing. There are plenty of remnants which survived after the dreadful earthquake in 1693.

Our first stop was the beautiful peninsula of Ortigia, surrounded by the Mediterranean on each side; it’s a beautiful town full of baroque architecture as well as Greek and Roman sites – piazzas full of restaurants, bars, shops and cafes. It’s a great base for discovering the baroque South East. I recommend hiring a car for sightseeing around the region and visiting truly unspoilt beaches as well as historical areas of Modica, Noto, Scicli and Ragusa.

An interesting twist to our afternoon in Modica, one of the area's UNESCO-listed Baroque towns, was a visit to the oldest chocolate shop in Modica. The Spaniards introduced the method of chocolate making to the Sicilians, something they had learned from the Aztecs and at the Antica Dolceria Bonajunto they are still making the chocolate with the same ancient techniques and ingredients. We joined in with a workshop and learnt how the chocolate was made.

It makes Modica a particularly appealing destination for food-lovers. The town hosts the international chocolate festival in December each year.

For anyone who has seen the BBC drama series Montalbano, based on the books featuring the Sicilian detective, Salvo Montalbano, by Andrea Camilleri, this whole area of Sicily will certainly inspire you.

Heading west from Modica, we stopped at a beautiful property, la Foresteria Planeta, a gorgeous agritourismo set on an elevated position overlooking vineyards.

The property is owned by one of Sicily’s wine producers Planeta, so a wine tasting opportunity could not be turned down. They specialise in cooking classes as well as wine tasting and the views from this property are simply irresistible. There are only 14 rooms here – such a gem of a property for those of you who enjoy being independent and exploring around. September would be especially interesting when the grapes and olives are being collected.

Lunch was at the famous restaurant Vittorio’s – a beautiful beach front premises and favourited by Rick Stein. On arrival, the chef was roasting artichoke hearts in an open fire – we knew we were in for something special. The coastline around this south west area of Sicily is stunning. Look out for the beach at Scala dei Turchi, a beautiful bathing spot surrounded by white cliffs.

Second base for us was just outside of Agrigento. It’s here where a visit to the ancient Greek archaeological site of the Valley of the Temples is a must for any visitor.  The Valley of the Temples is a Unesco World Heritage Site and I recommend taking a guided tour to bring the site to life.

Our last stop was Castellamare del Golfo in the north west of the country. The west of the country feels quite different from the south and the east – wilder, rugged, and even exotic with Moorish influences – a taste of North African as opposed to Italy. We were privileged to sail around the Zingaro Marine reserve, calm waters, rocky inlets and crystal clear water.

My favourite place on this trip was the area of San Vito Lo Capo – Sicily’s answer to Rio’s sugar loaf mountain. San Vito is a very laid back beach resort with some amazing eateries especially for lovers of sea food. Popular with Italians’, it’s only a matter of time when this stunning beach with white powdery sand will be visited by many more Europeans.

Some 700 kms later, I can truely say, I know Sicily better. It is very much "La splendida isola nel Mediterraneo."

Karen travelled with Prestige Holidays to Sicily in May 2016.

Peninsula hopping in Halkidiki.

Nothing energises you quite as much as a break from it all, even if it is a short one. Lucky for me, I was able to have one last week. This time, I was given a fabulous opportunity to experience Halkidiki, one of Greece’s lesser known destinations. Halkidiki is a region in northern Greece best known for its three peninsulas and I was fortunate enough to see the two of them.

On first impressions, I realised during my road transfer to the hotel is how green everything was and how the air was thick with the smell of pine trees and blooming flowers. Greece is famous for its herbs; every time I go there, I bring back bags, full of mountain tea (also known as shepherds tea), dried camomile, linden blossoms and a very special fragrant variety of mint with tiny purple flowers. Old Greek women say that a cup of mountain tea a day keeps a doctor away!

On my first day in Halkidiki we were given a little tour of Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. Big as it was, it took years to have the underground train system built. Thessaloniki had such a rich history that it had three cities layered on top of each other in the course of centuries. In situations like that drilling involves a certain amount of delays, caused by a fear of potentially destroying an important historical monument or object. Only an archaeological committee could give permission to carry on the works after having examined the site exhaustively.

There is nothing better than sitting in one of the numerous promenade tavernas with a cup of strong Greek coffee and looking at the mount Olympus with its white snow top. Aristotle Place is the centre of Thessaloniki, a location that is never dull or quiet even during the midday siesta. Aristotle is a special figure for this part of Greece as he was born in Stagira, a small town on the northern coast of country, which many Halkidiki travellers visit.

While in Halkidiki, taking a cruise to Mount Athos is strongly recommended. This World Heritage site is located on the third and farthest peninsula – a perfect, hard to reach place for hermits and devout Christians. Mount Athos has its own autonomy within Greece and is known under the official name of Autonomous Monastic State of the Holy Mountain. It has its own flag and government - “Holy Community”, consisting of the representatives of the 20 Holy Monasteries. Until this day, women are prohibited from entering to make living in celibacy easier for those who have chosen to do so.

The lengthy boat trip is often split with a rest in Ouranoupoli, a traditional port town. There you can have a delicious and a very reasonably priced lunch in one of the many seaside tavernas. If you have a moment, do wonder off into the labyrinth of narrow characterful streets.

After a long and eventful day of sightseeing, coming back to Anthemus Sea Beach Hotel and Spa was a real bliss. This five star property has everything for a relaxing and comfortable holiday. Set on a private beach with crystal clear water, it is perfect for couples and families alike. The food deserves a separate chapter – very fresh, flavourful and authentically Greek.

If you are after a peaceful holiday, within easy access to civilisation, look no further than Halkidiki.

Maryna travelled to Halkidki and stayed at the Anthemus Sea Beach Resort.

If you would like to enquire about your next trip to Greece, drop us an email on info@travelmatters.co.uk