Posts tagged explore
Madeira - a huge botanical garden

Madeira resembles a huge botanical garden, for a nature lover like myself it is a constant feast to the eyes, ears and the nose. Even in winter many flowers stay in bloom and the island retains its lush vegetation.

With its mountainous landscape and abundant greenery Madeira somewhat reminded me of St. Lucia in the Caribbean. Being a subtropical island, Madeira once was all covered by the indigenous rainforest, but the original settlers set fire to some parts of the island to clear the land for farming, giving the island its name in the process. Did you know that Madeira meant "wood" in Portuguese?

I travelled in November and we were blessed with a lovely weather, although we did have two days of rain, the spells were short-lived and gave way to bright sunshine. The island is called the land of the eternal spring, as even in winter the temperatures always stay in mid-teens. Summers are pleasantly warm and rarely get scorchingly hot.

The weather of course can vary depending on the altitude. Thus, when we travelled to Pico do Areeiro we were greeted by chilly rain and fog. Not surprising, considering that at 1,818 m high, it is the Island's third highest peak.

It is peculiar that in a land where butterflies fly around even in winter, almost every year you can encounter snow at the higher peaks of Madeira. No wonder locals say that Madeira Island is the only place where you can have 4 seasons in a day!

Being a volcanic island Madeira, has several peaks and is an ideal destination for hikers and cyclists. I highly recommend hiring a car and going around, otherwise you are bound to miss out on the most amazing sceneries and in Madeira, every stop presents a photo opportunity.

Madeira isn’t celebrated for its beaches and its sister island Porto Santo is much more suited for the task. Being a ferry ride (or a short flight) away it combines beautifully with Madeira.

Alternatively, how fun is it swimming in a natural pool like the one in Porto Moniz in Madeira?

But Madeira is not all about nature, it is also paradise for seafood lovers and there is no better place to sample it than in one of Madeira’s fishing villages.

Maryna has seen two very different properties whilst in Madeira. The first one was a very modern, edgy SPA hotel located in a picturesque location in Calheta. She loved spacious rooms with balconies overlooking the mountains and the ocean, as well as their gorgeous roof top infinity pool.

The second property was the iconic Belmond Reid’s Palace, very different in style, considering it was the first five-star hotel on the island and still manages to retain its period charm. Afternoon tea at Belmond Reid’s Palace is considered to be one of the must-dos while visiting the island. It can also be combined with a tour of the hotel's famous gardens. Staying at the hotel is even better, of course!

Reid’s Palace has hosted many a distinguished guest over the years, one of them was Winston Churchill who wanted to escape somewhere ‘warm, bath-able, comfortable and flowery’ where he could paint and work on his memoirs. That fits the description of Madeira perfectly!

Next time you want to go somewhere “flowery”, you know where it is! And as always, we are always here to help.

Maryna travelled to the island in November.

South Africa - one of the most spectacular countries in the world

There is no denying that South Africa is one of the most spectacular countries in the world. Distances are vast covering areas that not only differ in terrain, but also in climate and flora and fauna. And there is no better way to discover a country than on a road trip.

My husband and I have just returned from the most magical trip to the country having covered over 5,000 km. It was incredible to see how the country was slowly changing along the way from Cape Town to Johannesburg.

I’m always curious to see what countries look like outside the busy season. My conclusion is that South Africa in our summer months (their winter) is not only not lacking in anything but in many ways provides a superior experience.

The easiest answer is that rates are much more attractive and crowds are greatly reduced. The foliage is not as thick and allows for a better wildlife viewing. In their winter months the risk of malaria is significantly lower. In fact, I haven’t seen any mosquitoes at all! Winter is also the time when most snakes are hibernating. The last but not the least, the weather is very pleasant. During the day the temperatures in Kruger park area can go as high as 25-30 degrees, which is much preferred to 40 degrees that you would get in summer months.

Temperatures do drop as soon as the sun goes down but then you will be welcomed by a merry fireplace upon arrival from your game drive.

Since South Africa is such a big country, it is very difficult to cram all the information in so I decided to split my blog in two, writing about Eastern and Western capes separately.

We started our Eastern cape adventure with a stay at the Fugitive’s Drift Lodge. Traveling is extremely educational and some accommodation can be not only comfortable and gorgeous but also an experience in itself. One of them is definitely Fugitives' Drift Lodge and Guest House. Just wow! I wasn’t so impressed in a long time! It is THE place to stay if you want to learn more about the Anglo-Zulu War. I went on their Rorke’s Drift battle tour, the battle immortalised by the film Zulu. The talented guides will paint such a vivid picture of the events that it will leave you deeply moved. The accommodation varies from very comfortable and affordable to luxurious and all options have terraces with spectacular views. Guests are encouraged to explore the extensive grounds. It is very safe as they have no predators, but you are guaranteed to meet giraffes, zebras, kudus and impalas.

Our next stop was the kingdom of Swaziland or Eswatini as it is now known. I was really gutted that we only had one night to spend in this little country. Swazis are known for loving their king and why wouldn’t they? The country is extremely well run. As soon as you enter you see anti-corruption posters. The country is extremely clean, there are bins everywhere as well as signs urging people to keep the country clean. In addition, litter pickers clean the streets every morning. From what I have seen, Swaziland is a good producer of timber, but they do not just hack out all their forests without thinking about tomorrow. They plant special timber types and once one area gets cleared out they re-plant it with new young trees, so that they have a constant supply. The country itself is beautiful and people are just so helpful and smiley. The standard of living is good for Africa but if you go off the beaten track inland you will still find these charming traditional mud huts.

Swaziland is known for its safaris and culture, but not many people know that around Pig’s Peak you can also find ancient rock paintings. The Nsangwini Rock Shelter is the largest example of San art in the country and is said to provide the most comprehensive display in Swaziland.

4000 years ago, the San people used this Highveld area for spiritual rituals and for recording iconic moments in their lives through etchings on the ancient rocks. The paintings are remarkably clear and informative interpretations are given by members of the Nsangwini community, who manage and maintain the site.

The drive to the place is spectacular, mostly on orange soiled forest roads dotted with local houses.

The next day we made our way to the town of Graskop which serves as a gateway to the beautiful Panorama Route. It must have been one of our favourite places in South Africa. Allow at least two days to explore as the sites are numerous and the views are just to die for! The most notable stops are The God’s Window, Three Rondavels Viewpoint and Bourke’s Luck Potholes.

No trip to South Africa is complete without a safari and we managed to experience it two different ways, both with an experienced guide and a self-drive at the Kruger national park.

First, we spent two unforgettable nights at the Garonga Safari camp, situated in the Makalali Conservancy. The camp consists of the main camp with just six luxury tents as well as the Little Garonga offering three luxury suites, and that’s where we were very lucky to stay.

Safari drives always involve a fair share of luck and boy did we get lucky on our very first drive, where we witnessed a pride of lions devouring a giraffe with hyenas and vultures waiting for their turn nearby.

Or how about three rhinos grazing peacefully right in front of our jeep?

If you can’t afford to stay in a luxury lodge but are still keen to see wildlife, self-drive in Kruger is an excellent option. It is safe and easy, once you follow all the instructions. Or you can arrange a game-drive with a local guide at the reserve. Expect to see tons of zebras, kudus, impalas, elephants and giraffes. Wildebeests, rhinos, lions, buffalos and hippos are relatively easy to spot as well, but you may need to go several times. As always cheetahs and leopards are very elusive, but you are very likely to see them if you spend a few days there.

Our last stop before heading home was Johannesburg, also known as Joburg, Jozi and the City of Gold. The city that wasn’t supposed to be there if it were not for the discovery of gold, but now the second biggest city in Africa after Cairo. Impressive considering it is only over 120 years old. It is away from any source of water and is also relatively high at 1753 meters giving some people slight altitude sickness. These days the water to the city comes all the way from the mountains of Lesotho around 300 km away. Johannesburg is also home to the Cradle of Humankind.

We stayed at the Four Seasons the Westcliff. Having had a tour of the city, I don’t think you can be located in a better position. The area is safe, green and provides excellent views. The hotel is an oasis of calm and luxury in this hectic city. Having a glass of wine on the balcony and enjoying the views and the sun was such a bliss! As always, the service and the standard of accommodation was impeccable! Highly recommended.

Look out for the part two of my blog!

Maryna travelled to South Africa in June 2018. You can speak to her in the agency from Monday to Friday.

Santa Eularia des Riu - Ibiza

Santa Eularia des Riu is one of Ibiza's five municipalities and is the second largest region in Ibiza. Located on the Eastern shore, it also includes an impressive stretch of coastline with more than 20 beaches as well as rural farmland. It's a corner of the island far removed from the clubs of San Antonio opting for a brand of tourism that is respectful to the environment while honouring local roots and traditions. All elements close to our hearts here at Travel Matters. The area also focuses on family holidays and it was this aspect of the region that I set out to find out more about over the first Bank Holiday weekend.

Santa Eularia des Riu is the first municipality in the Balearic Islands to implement a family tourism seal guaranteeing that hotels, restaurants and attractions fulfil the needs and specific requirements for families.  Hotels with the seal have a long list of requirements to fulfil, too many to name them all but they include providing children's entertainment, child-proof wall sockets in rooms and common areas, children's menus in dining rooms and buffets, cots, baby baths, doors that do not catch little fingers. Every thought has been given to a child's safety, well being and enjoyment and if your child is protected and content, then there’s every chance you are going to be as well! This new initiative focusing on the family market is known as 'Family Moments'.

Es Figueral Beach

Es Figueral Beach

Most families will be visiting the region for the 46 km of sun-soaked pristine beaches with crystal-clear waters thanks to the sea grass growing on the coastal bed. The gently shelving water is a plus and I loved the fact that the Santa Eularia beach is the first non-smoking beach in the Balearic Islands. No danger of your toddler digging up cigarette butts when making sandcastles here. Santa Eularia also has some of the best gelato parlors I've come across outside of Italy. 

The beach of Cala Llonga (my personal favourite) has been certified with the Universal Accessibility IS 17001.  Basically this means that the beach is fully accessible for people with mobility issues, from the parking area to the sea including a service of assisted bathing with amphibious wheelchairs and crutches.  We're keen here at Travel Matters to promote multi-generational holidays and Cala Llonga would be a good resort to visit, if travelling with a grand-parent with mobility issues.

I was based for my stay in Santa Eularia itself at two contrasting hotels who have signed their commitment to the 'Family Moments'programme. The first Hotel Riomar is located just metres from the beach, with magnificent sea views and is a good starting point for the 3.1 km 'River Route' taking in highlights of the town's cultural, historical and natural attractions. On the other side of the bay, Aguas de Ibiza is a luxury design hotel with a free spa, outdoor pool and rooftop bar with views of the marina and the island of Formentera. This 5 star, all white, contemporary hotel, although fulfilling the family seal requirements would also make an excellent choice for an adult only mini break.

However, the big hitter, the grand dame so to speak of family focused hotels in the region is the Invisa Figueral Resort including Invisa Hotel Club Cala Verde and Invisa Hotel Club Cala Blanca www.invisahoteles.com. Located 10 km from Santa Eularia on Es Figueral beach, one of the finest on the island and with a good range of nautical activities - the likes of paddle surfs, canoes and pedalos. The hotel has some excellent family rooms, a water park that looked enormous fun for both adults and children and even the children's buffet had me drooling.

Santa Eularia des Riu was the cradle of the hippie movement on the island. If you have teens in tow then a trip to the hippy market every Saturday at Las Dalias in San Carlos is an absolute must. There are no shortage of stalls selling the sort of festival gear, peasant blouses and flower braids that are currently enormously popular and a fraction of the price you'll find at one of our local chichi boutiques or at this summer's festivals. I went crazy for the jewellery, stocking up my present draw for years to come. The biggest market though is the Punta Arabi Hippy Market on Wednesdays in Es Cana, but more touristy and the quality perhaps not quite as good. Toddlers on the other hand might enjoy a visit to Eco Finca Can Muson, www.ibizacanmuson.com also part of the Family Moments charter. This is a charming, simple rural farm where your little ones can feed the chickens and goats whilst you indulge in the delicious home-made cakes!

However, the undoubted highlight of my visit was the fact I was there for the May fiesta, the main celebration being the first Sunday in May. Next year on May 5th and a visit could easily be combined with the May bank holiday. There is folk dancing, a long procession of carts decked out in flowers and ribbons, people wearing traditional dress, flower shows, basically folklore fun for all the family. If there's something the Spanish do very well, then it's their fiestas. I tend to go to one a year (last year the Semana Santa celebrations in Madrid) and this was one of the most joyous and heart-warming I have ever attended.

Petra with traditionally dressed ladies at the May fiesta

Petra with traditionally dressed ladies at the May fiesta

In 1912, the painter Laurea Barrau remarked on Santa Eularia des Riu that, "Everything here is more beautiful than I could have imagined. A painter's entire life can be found here" This was my first visit to Ibiza and I too found the region not only very beautiful (the wild flowers were out in profusion) but welcoming, warm and above all particularly child friendly.

To find out more about the region visit http://visitsantaeulalia.com/en/

Petra visited Ibiza in May 2018.

A Caribbean island hopping experience

Not many people have the Caribbean on their summer radar and that really is a shame. The rates are unbelievably attractive and the weather is good. Humidity is higher, it is true, but on the whole it is sunny and hot with short spells of occasional rain, sometimes only several minutes long – and then it's business as usual!

I hear opinions that the Caribbean is just all about beaches, hotels and a glitzy lifestyle and there is not much else. Sure, the islands  won’t make cultural destinations of the year any time soon, but there is still enough activities to keep one occupied in between the tan topping sessions.

Barbados has such a rich Dutch and British heritage and this gets reflected in many ways. A tour of Bridgetown combined with Mount Gay distillery visit - apparently the oldest rum distillery in the world - makes for an interesting day out. You should consider a visit to the colourful Speightstown with its impressive fresco or manicured Holetown, which looks really western with its beautiful residences and designer boutiques. Barbados is also home to a great number of gorgeous Anglican churches that fit harmoniously with the lush tropical settings. Or how about a visit to one of the historical plantation great houses, like Sunbury Plantation House or St. Nicholas Abbey? It is a great way to find out how sugar cane plantations operated centuries ago and taste yet more rum!

Nature lovers would be happy with snorkelling, swimming with turtles, visiting Harrisons Cave or one of the botanical gardens. I strongly recommend heading to the East coast for a day. Bathsheba is home to the famous reef break known as the Soup Bowl. The coastline is beautiful and rugged and its sea front restaurants and weird rock formations that point out of the sand are worth the visit alone.

When it comes to accommodation in Barbados, you are spoilt for choice – Sandy Lane, Cobbler’s Cove, Colony Club, Fairmont Royal Pavilion – the list goes on. I, personally, thoroughly enjoyed my stay at The Little Good Harbour – an intimate family-run property located in a quiet fishing village on the famed west coast. The atmosphere is very laid back and truly Caribbean, which in my opinion some higher end properties might sometimes lack. Accommodation ranges from one-bedroom suites to three bedroom units and is equally perfect for couples, groups of friends or families. I just loved my split-level Garden suite! Their restaurant, The Fish Pot is one of the best eateries on the island and is an attraction in itself. Book early! Needless to say, the food is outstanding. I particularly enjoyed my breakfast of flying fish on toast.

Cobblers Cove is another place where I would go back to in a heart beat. It is a member of the prestigious Relais and Chateaux hotel group and is everything that one would expect – small, charming, with a service that is equal to none. It is a truly special place!The suites are not only absolutely stunning but are also ideal for bird watching. I counted no less than a dozen of species from my balcony and even had a nest right next to my window. It is not surprising considering, its gardens are not dissimilar to Eden itself. Their restaurant is very famous as well and is well worth a visit if you are staying elsewhere.Once you arrive in St. Lucia you end up in a totally different world. Even though all the islands are known collectively as the Caribbean they all are very unique and have their own identity. St Lucia differs from Barbados like day and night. It is still relatively undeveloped and unspoilt and is sometimes referred to like Barbados 20 years ago. It's landscape is very different as well - it's is very mountainous and tropically green where Barbados is flat and bare. The jewel on the crown is of course the majestic Pitons.

If Barbados is more known for its night life, high profile visitors and upmarket restaurants, St Lucia is more about uniting with the nature and getting away from it all. Many hotels are eco friendly and are blended seamlessly into the surroundings. Even the attractions are mostly nature oriented like snorkelling, diving, zip wiring or visiting the sulphur springs of Soufriere.

I had a chance to experience two properties while in St. Lucia.

East Winds is a beautiful "all-inclusive" resort, but don't let the a-word put you off. It is very small, characterful and the food is to die for - very authentic, healthy and fresh. We fell in love with our deluxe cottage with a private terrace sheltered under the canopy of mango trees.At East Winds I understood the true meaning of a Caribbean holiday, where all you do is sip on a cocktail, look at the waves and read in a hammock. I came back recharged and looking several years younger. But it's not all about low-key rest. There are plenty of daily activities on offer for busy types.

Another property that I was very lucky to experience was Marigot Bay Resort by Capella. It occupies one of the most enviable locations on the island overlooking the famous bay as well the picture perfect marina. If you are after pure luxury, stunning views, poolside sushi and exceptional service with your own personal concierge then this is the place to be.

The rooms are elegant and contemporary and finished to the highest standard.If you are going for a longer holiday, why not combine a week on the beach with a few days at the Capella for a truly special holiday?

In conclusion I want to officially announce my island hopping experience a success and am already looking forward to another combination next year.

Mauritius with Maryna

I must confess, that while many of you had little to no sunshine to enjoy in the UK, I had the privilege to catch some rays in Mauritius, courtesy of Beachcomber hotel group. Before I went to Mauritius I had a stereotype in my head, just like anyone else. What do we instantly think of this little Indian Ocean country? It’s a place where you can find some of the best beaches, world class hotels, scrumptious seafood dishes and a melting pot of culture. Tick, tick, tick, tick plus so much more, as I have discovered. It came as a bit of a surprise that being only the size of Surrey this island country kept me occupied for good six days.

In my opinion the southern and the northern parts of the island differ enough for them both to deserve a visit. The north west boasts of the best beaches on the island. If powdery white sand similar to that in the Maldives is your idea of a perfect beach than that is where you need to be headed. From there you can also take a day trip to Port Louis, the capital and the biggest city in Mauritius full of cultural and historical treasures that should not be missed.

On the other hand the southern part of the island is ideal for nature enthusiasts as well as for beach lovers. The majestic mountains and lush vegetation set the scene for a holiday that can’t be forgotten. This part of the island has also kept a feeling of “old Mauritius”, whether it is the manner of the people, their traditions or the unspoilt scenery.

A visit to La Vanille Nature Park will make for an enjoyable day out for the whole family. It is home to a vast array of wildlife including giant tortoises, who are extremely friendly and enjoy a good tickle under their chins.

A drive to Black River Gorges national park is as spectacular as the park itself, famous for its waterfalls, vistas, bird-watching and hiking.

While there take a short detour to the “seven-colored earth” of Chamarel, a major tourist attraction of Mauritius, created by volcanic rocks that cooled at different temperatures.

If rum is your tipple of choice or you are just fascinated by how things are produced then a visit to Rhumerie De Chamarel could be easily combined with the above activities.I was extremely fortunate to experience all eight Beachcomber properties, that are scattered around the island. Being the oldest hotel group in Mauritius they had a privilege to pick the best and most exclusive locations throughout the island before their competitors saw the potential of the destination.

It’s not an exaggeration when I say that their hotels can offers something for everyone. They range from four to an impressive six star and are perfect for families, golfers and romantic breaks alike.

British Airways offer an excellent overnight direct service to Mauritius from London Gatwick.

Maryna travelled courtesy of Beachcomber Hotels and their partner British Airways in December 2016

Peninsula hopping in Halkidiki.

Nothing energises you quite as much as a break from it all, even if it is a short one. Lucky for me, I was able to have one last week. This time, I was given a fabulous opportunity to experience Halkidiki, one of Greece’s lesser known destinations. Halkidiki is a region in northern Greece best known for its three peninsulas and I was fortunate enough to see the two of them.

On first impressions, I realised during my road transfer to the hotel is how green everything was and how the air was thick with the smell of pine trees and blooming flowers. Greece is famous for its herbs; every time I go there, I bring back bags, full of mountain tea (also known as shepherds tea), dried camomile, linden blossoms and a very special fragrant variety of mint with tiny purple flowers. Old Greek women say that a cup of mountain tea a day keeps a doctor away!

On my first day in Halkidiki we were given a little tour of Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. Big as it was, it took years to have the underground train system built. Thessaloniki had such a rich history that it had three cities layered on top of each other in the course of centuries. In situations like that drilling involves a certain amount of delays, caused by a fear of potentially destroying an important historical monument or object. Only an archaeological committee could give permission to carry on the works after having examined the site exhaustively.

There is nothing better than sitting in one of the numerous promenade tavernas with a cup of strong Greek coffee and looking at the mount Olympus with its white snow top. Aristotle Place is the centre of Thessaloniki, a location that is never dull or quiet even during the midday siesta. Aristotle is a special figure for this part of Greece as he was born in Stagira, a small town on the northern coast of country, which many Halkidiki travellers visit.

While in Halkidiki, taking a cruise to Mount Athos is strongly recommended. This World Heritage site is located on the third and farthest peninsula – a perfect, hard to reach place for hermits and devout Christians. Mount Athos has its own autonomy within Greece and is known under the official name of Autonomous Monastic State of the Holy Mountain. It has its own flag and government - “Holy Community”, consisting of the representatives of the 20 Holy Monasteries. Until this day, women are prohibited from entering to make living in celibacy easier for those who have chosen to do so.

The lengthy boat trip is often split with a rest in Ouranoupoli, a traditional port town. There you can have a delicious and a very reasonably priced lunch in one of the many seaside tavernas. If you have a moment, do wonder off into the labyrinth of narrow characterful streets.

After a long and eventful day of sightseeing, coming back to Anthemus Sea Beach Hotel and Spa was a real bliss. This five star property has everything for a relaxing and comfortable holiday. Set on a private beach with crystal clear water, it is perfect for couples and families alike. The food deserves a separate chapter – very fresh, flavourful and authentically Greek.

If you are after a peaceful holiday, within easy access to civilisation, look no further than Halkidiki.

Maryna travelled to Halkidki and stayed at the Anthemus Sea Beach Resort.

If you would like to enquire about your next trip to Greece, drop us an email on info@travelmatters.co.uk